House Members Filing Articles Of Impeachment Against AG Eric Holder On Thursday

Well…this story from TheBlaze.com is “fun”…but, it won’t go anywhere because it is in the SENATE where a conviction for impeachment takes place. Dems control the Senate. This will go nowhere because “The Constitution requires a two-thirds vote of the Senate to convict…” I don’t believe that there are enough clear-thinking Democrats within the Senate body who would set-aside their politics and vote to convict…no matter how justified the merit of the charges brought forth.

From this story on TheBlaze.com:

A group of fed-up House Republicans who say they are tired of being stonewalled by Attorney General Eric Holder plan to formally introduce articles of impeachment on Thursday in a bid to remove the nation’s top law enforcement officer from office.

Several GOP congressmen have been drafting articles of impeachment over a number of controversies relating to the U.S. Department of Justice. The lawmakers’ grievances include Holder’s refusal to turn over documents relating to Operation Fast and Furious, the DOJ’s habit of selectively enforcing federal laws, and the department’s refusal to prosecute IRS officials who accessed confidential taxpayer information, among other things.

The articles of impeachment also accuse Holder of providing false testimony to Congress, which is a “clear violation” of the law.

If you’d like to know more about the role of the United States Senate during impeachment proceedings, go HERE. (Or keep reading…)

From Senate.gov:

The Senate’s Impeachment Role

The United States Constitution provides that the House of Representatives “shall have the sole Power of Impeachment” (Article I, section 2) and that “the Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments …. [but] no person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two-thirds of the Members present” (Article I, section 3). The president, vice president, and all civil officers of the United States are subject to impeachment.

The concept of impeachment originated in England and was adopted by many of the American colonial governments and state constitutions. At the Constitutional Convention in 1787, the framers considered several possibilities before deciding that the Senate should try impeachments.

Impeachment is a very serious affair. This power of Congress is the ultimate weapon against officials of the federal government, and is a fundamental component of the constitutional system of “checks and balances.” In impeachment proceedings, the House of Representatives charges an official by approving, by majority vote, articles of impeachment. A committee of representatives, called “managers,” acts as prosecutors before the Senate. The Senate Chamber serves as the courtroom. The Senate becomes jury and judge, except in the case of presidential impeachment trials when the chief justice of the United States presides. The Constitution requires a two-thirds vote of the Senate to convict, and the penalty for an impeached official is removal from office. In some cases, disqualification from holding future offices is also imposed. There is no appeal.

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About Shelly Dankert

Unrepentant Conservative blogger.
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